Online Portfolio for Arts Council DYCP

Artist Interview, 2018 (3m22s)

To The Ends Of The Earth, 2020

Film projection onto a shipping container located in the central Australian desert, 1,500 kilometres from the ocean.

An experimental film (9m19s) reflecting on my relationship with the sea, horizon, and sky – my three constants within the marine environment – using film and photographs shot during my journeys onboard a cargo ship, a tall ship and a yacht in the Arctic, Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans. Sailing over eleven thousand miles, I discover the remoteness and connectedness of each location – pristine environments broken by our presence.

All This Stuff Is Killing Me, 2019

A 7ft cubed recycled cardboard shipping container containing: film footage and photographs (35 minutes); a list of everything I own; and purchased and inherited artefacts.

The culmination of a year-long low-carbon footprint journey considering the relationships between mass-consumption, personal identity and environmental change.

Beginning in June 2018, I shed material possessions and set off by bicycle, taking only what I needed. Along the way I visited a series of Amazon distribution centres in the UK, spent a month at sea onboard a cargo ship, and visited sites of personal significance in New Zealand.

All At Sea, 2019

A 7ft cubed recycled cardboard shipping container containing: film footage and photographs (35 minutes); a list of everything I own; and purchased and inherited artefacts.

The culmination of a year-long low-carbon footprint journey considering the relationships between mass-consumption, personal identity and environmental change. Beginning in June 2018, I shed material possessions and set off by bicycle, taking only what I needed. Along the way I visited a series of Amazon distribution centres in the UK, spent a month at sea onboard a cargo ship, and visited sites of personal significance in New Zealand.

The Conspicuous Consumer's Tale, 2018

A pilgrimage to Amazon warehouses in the UK. I cycled 2367 miles from 25th June to 29th September 2018, carrying a copy of The Canterbury Tales by Chaucer, and visiting Amazon warehouses at Bristol, Swansea, Tilbury, Hemel Hempstead, Dunstable, Milton Keynes, Daventry, Coventry, Rugby, Peterborough, Coalville, Doncaster, Dunfermline, Gourock, Bolton, Altrincham and Warrington.

Beach Clean, 2017

Timelapse film and installation with collected marine plastic debris frozen in filtered Arctic seawater. Filmed in Longyearbyen, Svalbard on 17th October 2017. Plastic debris was collected from two beaches, Smeerenburg and Fram Bay, over the course of a day and included fishing nets, ropes, strapping band, boots, shoes, rubber gloves, bottles, and many miscellaneous plastic fragments.

270 Single Uses, 2017

Installation with 270 ice casts of plastic bottles. Installed at Granary Square fountains, King Cross, on the 23rd May 2017.

Inspired by the WEF paper on Circular Economy and a computer model developed by scientists at the Grantham Institute, which maps the path of plastic in the oceans and predicts that most marine plastic pollution from the UK ends up in the Arctic taking less than two years to get there.

Core, 2017

Recycled high-density polyethylene and polypropylene (plastic packaging) mix casts arranged in geological core sample boxes, 185 x 108 x 50cm

Research published in 2014 in the Royal Society Open Science Journal suggests that the deep sea is a major global sink for microplastic debris. Microplastics, in the form of fibres, were found in abundance in deep-sea sediment cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean. Samples contained mostly blue, black, green, and red microfibres of rayon, polyester, polymides, acetate, and acrylic.

Strata, 2017

Low-density polyethylene (plastic bags) cast in polyester resin, 65 x 65 x 10cm

Slice I-V, 2017

Sliced high-density polyethylene (plastic packaging) and low-density polyethylene (plastic bags) cube casts, 70 x 20cm

Over time plastic breaks down into microplastics, which are now found in abundance throughout the Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and sediments.

What Goes Around Comes Around, 2016

Installation with film (1m43s), oil drums, ice, water, and plastic. Visualising climate change: exploring the impact of plastic waste in water.